Бронхиальная астма и воздействие производственных факторов: клинические рекомендации Европейского респираторного общества

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Аннотация

Источник: Baur X., Sigsgaard T., Aasen T.B. et al. Guidelines for the management of work)related asthma. Eur. Respir. J. 2012; 39: 529–545.

DOI: 10.1183/09031936.00096111


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Для цитирования: Редакционная с. Бронхиальная астма и воздействие производственных факторов: клинические рекомендации Европейского респираторного общества.  Пульмонология. 2012;(3):17-36.

For citation: . Bronchial asthma and exposure to occupational agents: clinical guidelines of European Respiratory Society. Russian Pulmonology. 2012;(3):17-36. (In Russ.)

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