Руководство по диагностике и лечению пищевой аллергии в США

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По материалам: Boyce J.A., Assa’ad A., Burks A.W. et al. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID)Sponsored Expert Panel. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 2010; 126 (6, Suppl.): S1–S58.


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